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A few nice Pregnancy images I found:

Image from page 297 of “The diagnosis, pathology and treatment of diseases of women including the diagnosis of pregnancy” (1868)
Pregnancy
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Identifier: diagnosispatholo00hewi
Title: The diagnosis, pathology and treatment of diseases of women including the diagnosis of pregnancy
Year: 1868 (1860s)
Authors: Hewitt, Graily, 1828-1893
Subjects: Gynecologic pathology Women Gynecology Pregnancy
Publisher: Philadelphia : Lindsay & Blakiston
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

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Text Appearing Before Image:
[Fig. 84 shows a notuncommon position of the gravid uterus at the sixth month,] 292 DIAGNOSIS. Then as regards the position of the tumor, it must not be sup-posed that the gravid uterus rises up in the median line and main-tains this position throughout the whole period of pregnancy.This is a very common error, and one which has frequently led tomisconception and even worse. The fact is that the uterus doesat first, and during the first two or three months, occupy a medianposition—until it becomes bulky and rises into the abdomen.But once in the abdomen it generally occupies for the next twomonths—that is to say, speaking broadly, during the fifth, sixth,and part of the seventh months—a lateral position, being mostfrequently found on the right side of the abdomen. The degree ofthe lateral displacement varies in different cases, it being greaterin some cases than in others, and when the abdomen is large, theintestines tympanitic, and the uterine tumor small in proportion Fig. 34.

Text Appearing After Image:
to the period of the pregnancy, the tumor may be, and has been,overlooked, owing to the observer not being aware of this normallateral deviation. See Fig. 34. We may now consider for a moment the indications to be draAvnfrom the size and position of the tumor in the abdomen, as to theexistence or absence of pregnancy in the case before us. Themost important circumstance to bear in mind in deciding for oragainst pregnancy—size and position of the tumor alone consid-ered— is the relation which we find to subsist between the size andthe duration of the tumor. Thus we examine the abdomen on aparticular day, and find a tumor extending to half way betweenthe pubes and umbilicus ; and examining the same case two monthslater, we find the upper border a little way above the umbilicus. TUMORS TRACEABLE INTO PELVIS PREGNANCY. 293 If Other signs of pregnancy be present, or rather if they be notabsent, such an amount of growth in such a space of time in itselffavors the presumption that the ca

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 803 of “A theoretical and practical treatise on midwifery : including the diseases of pregnancy and parturition and the attentions required by the child from birth to the period of weaning” (1866)
Pregnancy
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Identifier: theoreticalpract01caze
Title: A theoretical and practical treatise on midwifery : including the diseases of pregnancy and parturition and the attentions required by the child from birth to the period of weaning
Year: 1866 (1860s)
Authors: Cazeaux, P. (Pierre), 1808-1862
Subjects: Obstetrics Pregnancy Complications Obstetrics Midwifery
Publisher: Philadelphia : Lindsay and Blakiston
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

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being changed into a state of pronation, and then comes forward and to the left to grasp the feet, which are next brought down into the vagina. (Fig. 107.) C. First Position of the Left Shoulder (left cephalo-iliac).—The left hand is introduced in a state of supination, and then,after pressing the shoulder upwards and a littleto the left, it is directed along the childsback towards the right posterior part of thepelvis, where it is passed around the breechby turning to a state of pronation, and is nextbrought forward and to the right, so as toseize the feet. D. Second Position of the Left Shoulder(right cephalo-iliac).—The left hand, intro-duced in a state of supination, pushes theshoulder above the superior strait and some-what to the right; and then, passing towardsthe left side and posterior part of the uterus,it goes in search of the feet, which are foundthere.1 Trunk Presentations with a Descent of the Arm. (Presentations of the arm or hand, of authors.)—We have heretofore

Text Appearing After Image:
Mode of seizing the feet in the secondposition of the left shoulder. 1 As the reader will see, this operation is very simple; though it must be acknowledged,however, that, in those cases in which the dorsal plane of the foetus is directed forwards,it renders this plane liable to be turned backwards after the evolution of the child. Con-sequently when we cannot succeed in turning the belly posteriorly during the traction, it OF VERSION. 793 stated that the descent of the hand in the shoulder presentations, is nothing morethan an attendant circumstance of these latter. Consequently, whether the handhas been carried along by the gush of waters which escaped when the membraneswere ruptured, or whether it has been drawn down by the accoucheur himself,in order to make out the diagnosis, it constitutes an obstacle of minor import-ance, and even^me which may render the pelvic version more easy; hence, sofar from attempting to push back the arm into the uterus, we ought to apply afillet on the

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 619 of “A theoretical and practical treatise on midwifery : including the diseases of pregnancy and parturition and the attentions required by the child from birth to the period of weaning” (1866)
Pregnancy
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: theoreticalpract01caze
Title: A theoretical and practical treatise on midwifery : including the diseases of pregnancy and parturition and the attentions required by the child from birth to the period of weaning
Year: 1866 (1860s)
Authors: Cazeaux, P. (Pierre), 1808-1862
Subjects: Obstetrics Pregnancy Complications Obstetrics Midwifery
Publisher: Philadelphia : Lindsay and Blakiston
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

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Text Appearing Before Image:
p. 287.) After having consulted with his father, whether itwas advisable to remove the polypus at once, the ques-tion was determined in the negative. In many cases, therefore, we may trust to the resources of the organism, remembering, at the same time,that too great a delay is not without danger both to themother and child; and, where the inefficiency of theuterine contractions has been fully ascertained, a divi-sion of the pedicle appears to us to be the only resource.If the subsequent extraction of the tumor is renderedvery difficult by its volume, it might be cut up intoseveral pieces, as I have seen done on two occasions, orbe firmly grasped with a small serrated forceps. Pelvicversion, which is recommended by some authors, couldbe performed in those cases only in which the length ofthe pedicle gives great mobility to the tumor, and allowsit to be pushed above the superior strait. It is un-necessary to add that, if the existence of this tumor in the canal be ascertained Fig. 93.

Text Appearing After Image:
This figure, taken fromRamsbothams work, showsthe situation of the polypusdescribed by him. TUMORS OF THE EXCAVATION. 609 during the latter months of gestation, it should he excised immediately, if it heof a sufficient size to render the parturition difficult or tedious. C. Fungous, or Cauliflower Tumors, &c.—These tumors, which resemble acauliflower in their appearance, may arise from either lip of the womb; and thenby acquiring a considerable size, they mask the orifice and render it nearly in-accessible. As they often give rise to hemorrhage, and as the spongy tissue thatconstitutes them has some analogy with the placental structure, they have occa-sionally been mistaken for a placenta prsevia. Both Madame Lachapelle andDenman relate errors of this character; and I witnessed the following still moresingular case. The internes of the Hospital de lOursine sent for M. Nekton,who was surgeon to the establishment, to turn in a supposed case of hand pre-sentation. M. Nekton desired

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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