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Image from page 78 of “Extra-Uterine pregnancy; a discussion” (1889)

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A few nice Pregnancy images I found:

Image from page 78 of “Extra-Uterine pregnancy; a discussion” (1889)
Pregnancy
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Identifier: extrauterinepreg00town
Title: Extra-Uterine pregnancy; a discussion
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Townsend, Franklin
Subjects: Pregnancy, Ectopic Pregnancy Complications
Publisher: Philadelphia, Dornan
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

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on it. The lectures are closed by a reference and tables of the length oftime of retention of the fetus, and cases of lithopedion. More thansimple reference to these is impossible. Mr. Taits tribute to Parry in the beginning of his book, and hiscontinual citation throughout his discussion, is well deserved, gen-erous, and graceful—a respect from the living teacher to the voice-less but speaking dead. No attempt has been made in this review to give the literature of 5 66 EXTRA-UTERINE PREGNANCY. the subject, ^yith Mr. Taits treatment of extra-uterine gestation,there is little need or use for ancient literature, save as it may benecessary to show how little was really known concerning it patho-logically ; j)radically nothing. His treatment marks a new era in the handling of this condition,and may be taken as tlie starting-point of its real surgery. [From Annals of Gynecoloyy, Boston, February, ]889. By pennisision.] PLATE III. /Imnton /l 7op o/ dutended broadligarnetit and tub. Rectum

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Ckorion Foetus wi£^fA. Obturator internua KJiJf/ ievatnr hmi Paraproctal lissve Sagittal lateral section (rijrht) ol pelvis, with extra uterine gestation in right broad ligament.—T.mt. [From Annals of Gynecology, Boston, February, 18S0. By pennlssion.] PLATE IV.

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Image from page 220 of “The diagnosis, pathology and treatment of diseases of women including the diagnosis of pregnancy” (1868)
Pregnancy
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Identifier: diagnosispatholo00hewi
Title: The diagnosis, pathology and treatment of diseases of women including the diagnosis of pregnancy
Year: 1868 (1860s)
Authors: Hewitt, Graily, 1828-1893
Subjects: Gynecologic pathology Women Gynecology Pregnancy
Publisher: Philadelphia : Lindsay & Blakiston
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

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of the former. (Fig. 18 represents a well-markedcase of this kind, the measurements accurately taken. The patienthad had children.) In like manner, the rectum is liable, but in aless degree, to be prolapsed with the loAver part of the uterus ; andthe result is that in cases of extensive prolapsus of the cervix, TUMORS AT THE OS UTERI. 215 -whether with or without hypertrophy of the part, there is a softtumor in front—the bladder—and a smaller one behind—the rec-tum—between which two the os uteri is situated. A combinedexamination of the rectum by the finger and of the bladder bymeans of the sound, will determine whether or not the fundus uteriis in its proper position ; the use of the uterine sound gives infor-mation of a like character. TRUE PROLAPSUS OF THE WHOLE UTERUS May be found associated with ascites, ovarian tumors (or both,as in a case which came under my own observation), or with re-laxation of the vaginal structures, consequent on frec;[uent child-bearing. Fig 18.

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In cas^s of prolapsus of the uterus, whether true or false, thereare often extensive ulcerations of the inverted vaginal mucousmembrane, or of the mucous membrane covering the vaginal por-tion, such ulcerations being dependent on the friction to which theparts thus unnaturally exposed are liable, and to the continuedcontact with urine. 216 DIAGNOSIS. Prolapsus, complete, or produced by hypertrophy of the supra-vaginal portion of the cervix, could hardly be mistaken for poly-pus, inversion of the uterus, or large tumors growing from the osuteri, if attention were paid to the position of the os in referenceto the body of the tumor. Cases of hypertrophy of the vaginalportion alone might possibly be confounded with a polypus pro-jecting into the vagina from the interior of the uterus, in thoseinstances in which the os uteri is distorted, partially effaced, or soaltered as not to be recognized as such, by a casual observer. Ihave known an instance in which a lady was treated for prolapsusa

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 586 of “The diagnosis, pathology and treatment of diseases of women including the diagnosis of pregnancy” (1868)
Pregnancy
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: diagnosispatholo00hewi
Title: The diagnosis, pathology and treatment of diseases of women including the diagnosis of pregnancy
Year: 1868 (1860s)
Authors: Hewitt, Graily, 1828-1893
Subjects: Gynecologic pathology Women Gynecology Pregnancy
Publisher: Philadelphia : Lindsay & Blakiston
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

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ement of one lip of theOS uteri (see Fig. 99) with the dilute acetic acid, using for thatpurpose a syringe specially constructed, but the patient was soonafter lost sight of. Bromine in solution has been lately used byDr. Routh and Dr. Wynn Williams, and they speak highly of itseffects as a local application in cancer of the uterus. We now come to the question of the palliative treatment of cases * Fig. 98. Carcinomatous tumors of the os uteri. (See also p. 224.)f Brit. Med. Jonrn., April 21, 1866. CANCER OF THE UTERUS, VAGINA, ETC. 581 of uterine cancer, where surgical measures are inapplicable. Thereare three conditions to the relief of which our attention is neces-sarily more particularly directed—the pain, the hemorrhage, andthe discharge ; and, besides relieving these, we have to devise meansfor maintaining the functions of the body generally in a state ofactivity, and for dealing with the many secondary evils likely topresent themselves in the course of this disease. Fig. 99.*

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The Jiemo7rhage is to be checked, if slight, by injections oficed water into the vagina and into the rectum ; if more severe,by application of pefchloride of iron or tannin, and by the actualcautery, or, in very severe cases, by plugging the vagina. Sir J.Y. Simpson speaks very highly of the employment of a saturatedsolution of perchloride of iron in glycerine, the solution beingapplied by means of a sponge to the bleeding surface, and with-drawn subsequently by means of a string attached to the sponge;it is most valuable. Tannin in fine powder, or tannic acid, maybe applied through a small tube, or, better still, in form of apessary. Tincture of matico is highly spoken of by some authors. * Fisf. 99. Carcinoma of os and cervix uteri. 582 PATHOLOGY AND TREATMENT. If fluids are injected to check the hemorrhage, care must be takenthat they actually come into contact with the bleeding surface.In cases of cauliflower excrescence not admitting of amputation ofthe cervix, the soft bleeding

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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